Vaccines You Need

Shots aren’t just for babies—preteens and teens need vaccines, too. Did you know, that during the preteen years, protection from some childhood vaccines begins to wear off? These are the shots needed for ages 11 and older:

Chickenpox (Varicella)
Var

If you have not been previously vaccinated and have not had chickenpox, you should get vaccinated against this disease. The vaccine is given as a 2-dose series. Any teenager who was vaccinated as a child with only 1 dose should get a second dose now.

COVID-19
COVID-19

All teens need to be protected from COVID-19. Vaccination needs to be repeated from time to time, either because vaccine protection wears off or because the vaccine needs to be updated in response to changes in the virus that causes COVID-19. Most children and adults only need one dose at a time. People who are immunocompromised may need more frequent doses.

Diphtheria (DTaP, Tdap, Td)
DTaP

You need a dose of Tdap at age 11–12 years. If you’re older and haven’t received it yet, you should get a dose of Tdap now. If you are pregnant, you’ll need an additional dose of Tdap. After that, everyone will need a Tdap or Td booster dose every ten years.

Hepatitis A
HepA

Anyone can get infected with hepatitis A. That is why many teens want to be protected by vaccination. All teens need this 2-dose series of shots.

Hepatitis B
HepB

You need a series of doses of hepatitis B vaccine if you have not already received them.

HPV (Human Papillomavirus)
HPV

All teens should get a series of 2 doses of HPV vaccine, beginning at age 11–12 years. If the series is started at age 15 years or older a 3 dose series is recommended. The vaccine protects against HPV (the most common cause of cervical cancer) and certain other types of cancers.

Influenza (Flu)
Flu

Every person, beginning at age 6 months and continuing throughout their lifetime, should receive yearly vaccination against influenza. Vaccination is the most effective step you can take to be protected from this serious disease.

Measles
MMR

Check with your healthcare provider to make sure you’ve had 2 doses of MMR.

Meningococcal Disease
MenACWY / MenB

There are two different types of meningococcal vaccines. These vaccines may be used to protect people during an outbreak of meningococcal disease. Talk with your healthcare provider to find out if your child needs one or both meningococcal vaccines.

  • Meningococcal conjugate vaccine or MenACWY: All preteens and teens age 11–18 years need 2 doses of MenACWY (first dose at 11–12 years and second dose at 16 years). If you are a first-year college student living in a residence hall, you need a dose of MenACWY if you have never received it or received it when you were younger than 16.
  • Meningococcal serogroup B vaccine or MenB: MenB vaccine may be given to any teen who wants protection from this disease, preferably at 16–23 years of age. Children age 10 years and older who are at risk due to certain health conditions also need MenB.

Mpox
Mpox

Teens who engage in certain types of sexual contact should be protected from Mpox infection.

Mumps
MMR

Check with your healthcare provider to make sure you’ve had 2 doses of MMR.

Pneumococcal Disease
PCV / PPSV

Do you have a serious health problem? Talk to your healthcare provider about whether you should receive a pneumococcal shot.

Polio
IPV

If you haven’t completed your series of polio vaccine doses and you are not yet 18, you should complete them now.

Rubella
MMR

Check with your healthcare provider to make sure you’ve had 2 doses of MMR.

Tetanus (Lockjaw)
Tdap / Td

You need a dose of Tdap at age 11–12 years. If you’re older and haven’t received it yet, you should get a dose of Tdap now. If you are pregnant, you’ll need an additional dose of Tdap. After that, everyone will need a Tdap or Td booster dose every ten years.

Whooping Cough (Pertussis)
Tdap / Td

You need a dose of Tdap at age 11–12 years. If you’re older and haven’t received it yet, you should get a dose of Tdap now. If you are pregnant, you’ll need an additional dose of Tdap. After that, everyone will need a Tdap or Td booster dose every ten years.

RESOURCES

Addressing Vaccination Anxiety in Adolescents and Adults: Strategies for Vaccine Recipients and Caregivers

This 1-page handout, designed for vaccine recipients and caregivers, describes strategies that can be followed before, during, and after the vaccination visit to improve the vaccination experience for adolescents and adults. Several useful resources are also listed.

Fainting Related to Vaccination: What You Need to Know

Ways to reduce the risk of vaccination-related fainting.

You’re 16 … We Recommend These Vaccines For You

You have the rest of your life in front of you. Be sure you’re protected against these serious diseases!

CDC Official Schedule Information

Where To Get Vaccinated

Vaccines are routinely available at doctors’ offices, health centers, and pharmacies. Special vaccination clinics are sometimes held at schools or other public locations. For more information see Where to Get Vaccinated.

This page was updated on .