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Adult Vaccines: Vaccines You Need

When Do Adults Need Vaccines?

Getting immunized is a lifelong, life-protecting job. Donít leave your healthcare providerís office without making sure youíve had all the vaccinations you need.
Chickenpox (varicella)
If you’ve never had chickenpox or were vaccinated but received only 1 dose, talk to your healthcare provider to find out if you need this vaccine.
>> learn more
Haemophilus influenzae type b
Some adults with certain high-risk conditions need vaccination with Hib. Talk to your healthcare provider to find out if you need this vaccine.
>> learn more
Hepatitis A
You need this vaccine if you have a specific risk factor for hepatitis A infection or if you simply want to be protected from this disease. The vaccine is usually given in 2 doses, 6 to 18 months apart.
>> learn more
Hepatitis B
You need this vaccine if you have a specific risk factor for hepatitis B infection or if you simply want to be protected from this disease. The vaccine is given in 3 doses, usually over 6 months.
>> learn more
Human papillomavirus
You need this vaccine if you are a woman age 26 years or younger or a man age 21 years or younger. Other men age 22 through 26 who want to be protected from HPV may receive it, too. Men age 22 through 26 years with a risk condition also need vaccination. Check with your healthcare provider. The vaccine is given in 3 doses over 6 months.
>> learn more
Influenza
You need a dose every fall (or winter) for your protection and for the protection of others around you.
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Measles, Mumps, Rubella
You need at least 1 dose of MMR if you were born in 1957 or later. Many people need a second dose.
>> learn more:
Measles
Mumps
Rubella
Meningococcal
You need this vaccine if you have one of several health conditions, or if you are 19Ė21 and a first-year college student living in a residence hall and you either have never been vaccinated or were vaccinated before age 16.
>> learn more
Pneumococcal
Adults age 65 years and older should receive the two types of pneumococcal vaccines (PCV13 and PPSV23). You also need 1Ė2 doses at an earlier age if you smoke cigarettes or have certain medical conditions. Talk to your healthcare provider to find out when and how often you need to be protected from pneumococcal disease.
>> learn more
Shingles (zoster)
If you are age 60 years or older, you should get a 1-time dose of this vaccine now.
>> learn more
Tetanus, Diphtheria, Pertussis (whooping cough)
All adults who have not yet received a dose of Tdap, as an adolescent or adult, need to get Tdap vaccine (the adult whooping cough vaccine). Pregnant women need a dose in every pregnancy. After that, you will need a Td booster dose every 10 years. Consult your healthcare provider if you haven’t had at least 3 tetanus- and diphtheria-containing shots sometime in your life or have a deep or dirty wound.
>> learn more:
Tetanus
Diphtheria
Whooping cough (Pertussis)
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Adult Vaccines
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Vaccine You Need
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Official Schedule Information
Getting immunized is a lifelong, life-protecting job. Talk with your healthcare provider about which vaccines you need and when you should be vaccinated. For more information, check the recommended immunization schedules:
Easy-Read Schedule
Easy-Read Schedule
Two-page guide about vaccines and the diseases they prevent
Adolescent & Adult Vaccine Quiz
Adolescent & Adult Vaccine Quiz
Take this quiz to find out which vaccines you may need
The HealthMap Vaccine Finder is a free online service that helps consumers locate vaccine providers of vaccines that doctors routinely recommend for adults
 
 
Content reviewed on September 19, 2014
Immunization Action Coalition  •  2550 University Avenue West  •  Suite 415 North  •  Saint Paul, Minnesota  •  55114
tel 651-647-9009  •  fax 651-647-9131
 
The Immunization Action Coalition (IAC), a non-profit organization, works to increase immunization rates and prevent disease by creating and distributing educational materials for health professionals and the public that enhance the delivery of safe and effective immunization services. IAC also facilitates communication about the safety, efficacy, and use of vaccines within the broad immunization community of patients, parents, healthcare organizations, and government health agencies.