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Human papillomavirus (HPV)
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Vaccine-Preventable Diseases

Human papillomavirus (HPV)

Human papillomavirus (HPV) is the most common sexually transmitted disease (STD) in the United States. HPV can lead to cervical cancer in women, as well as other oral and genital (sex organ) cancers in men and women. HPV also causes genital warts.
HPV is usually spread during sex. You can spread (or get) the virus without knowing it. Sometimes babies become infected from their mothers during birth.
HPV is the main cause of cervical cancer. In the United States, about 10,000 women get cervical cancer every year, and about 4,000 die from it. It can also lead to cancers of the vagina, vulva, penis, anus, throat, and mouth.
If you ever have sex, you are at risk. At least half of sexually active people get infected with HPV at some point in their lives.
Vaccination is the best way to prevent HPV infection.
HPV Vaccine Schedule
The vaccine is most effective if you get it before becoming sexually active. However, if you are already sexually active, you should still get vaccinated. Both girls and boys should get HPV vaccine, starting at around age 11–12 years. Older teens and young adults should also start or complete their HPV vaccine series. The vaccine is given in 3 doses over 6 months.
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Trusted Websites
HPV and Cervical Cancer Prevention Resource Center
HPV and Cervical Cancer Prevention Resource Center
Resources include advocacy information, hotline services, publications, support groups and postdoctoral research from the American Social Health Association
Cervical Cancer-Free America (CCFA)
Cervical Cancer-Free America (CCFA)
Offers resources from a collection of updated medical facts, policy updates, and organizational literature
National Cervical Cancer Coalition
National Cervical Cancer Coalition
Resources for women with cervical cancer, includes section devoted to survivor stories
NIH: Human Papillomavirus: Questions and Answers
NIH: Human Papillomavirus: Questions and Answers
Fact sheet about human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines for the prevention of infection with certain types of HPV, which is the major cause of cervical cancer
>> Spanish-language
Prevent HPV
Prevent HPV
Website for parents, provides information, resources and videos about HPV vaccination from the Vaccine Education Center
View all diseases and vaccines
Video Library
Video: Close the Door to Cancer
Close the Door to Cancer: More than 14 million people will be infected with HPV this year. HPV can cause cancers that affect both men and women. Prevent HPV -related cancers by vaccinating your boys and girls ages 11 or 12 years. Talk to your child's doctor about how you can close the door to cancer today.
>> view all HPV videos
Personal Testimonies
Stories of suffering and loss from human papillomavirus (HPV)
Christine Baze's Story
HPV Vaccine Has Potential to Reduce Worldwide Cancer Deaths by More Than 200,000
>> view all personal testimonies
More HPV Resources
Why Your Doctor Says You Should Get All 3 HPV Vaccine Shots
Why Your Doctor Says You Should Get All 3 HPV Vaccine Shots
Infographic about HPV
HPV: Make sure your child is protected
HPV: A parent's guide to preteen and teen HPV vaccination
Vaccine summary for parents
HPV: Make sure your child is protected
HPV: Make sure your child is protected
Vaccine summary for parents
>> Spanish-language
Protect Yourself from HPV
Protect Yourself from HPV
Vaccine summary for teens and adults
>> Spanish-language
HPV Questions & Answers
HPV Q&As
HPV disease and vaccine information
HPV: Overview for Parents
Overview for Parents
Frequently asked questions
>> Spanish-language
HPV Fact Sheet
HPV Fact Sheet
More in-depth information, includes a real-life story
HPV: Common Infection. Common Reality. Brochures
HPV: Common Infection. Common Reality. Brochures
Available in English and other languages
HPV: What You Should Know
What You Should Know
HPV Q&A fact sheet
>> Spanish-language
 
This page was reviewed on March 3, 2014
Immunization Action Coalition   •  Saint Paul, MN
tel 651-647-9009  •  fax 651-647-9131
 
The Immunization Action Coalition (IAC), a non-profit organization, works to increase immunization rates and prevent disease by creating and distributing educational materials for health professionals and the public that enhance the delivery of safe and effective immunization services. IAC also facilitates communication about the safety, efficacy, and use of vaccines within the broad immunization community of patients, parents, healthcare organizations, and government health agencies.